A Lesson from Fargo on Dividing Wealth & Power in Your Family Business

Elena Volkova on June 9, 2014

“And I guess that was your accomplice in the wood chipper? And those three people [dead] in Brainerd. And for what? For a little bit of money. There’s more to life than a little money, you know.” These famous words are spoken by Marge Gunderson in the closing scene of Fargo, a 1996 film classic by the Coen Brothers. Fargo is the cautionary tale of succession planning gone wrong for one family business, in which an employee at a car dealership gets no respect from the owner, his father-in-law. Harboring ambitions beyond his sales job, the son-in-law proposes a new Read More…


Why Every Entrepreneur Should Have A Business Coach

Elena Volkova on May 8, 2014

Hi there! I’ve been wanting to share something with you for a while now, but I keep hesitating. It’s something that I say in private conversations with anyone who will listen. I just wasn’t sure how the message would be received if I broadcast it to all of our readers. But the truth is, I feel so strongly about this, that I believe I would be doing you a disservice if I did not say it. So, here it is… If you are starting a business by yourself, please get a business coach. You’re a professional and an expert at Read More…


An Incorporation Dilemma: Delaware vs New York

Elena Volkova on December 18, 2013

I got a call from someone the other day. A start-up with a brilliant idea behind the business. New York is where they live and conduct business… But they wanted to incorporate in Delaware. Now, me being the incorporation-loving lawyer I am, I had some strong opinions about this. (Basically, I wanted to talk them out of it.) See, for most small businesses who do business in New York, there is nothing to gain by having a Delaware presence. In fact, incorporating in Delaware means an extra set of expenses and regulatory compliance requirements. But I hear business owners asking Read More…


Why Every Start Up Should Have a “Work for Hire” Agreement

Sasha Herzig on December 4, 2013

“Work for hire” agreements lay out who owns the copyright to the work created by a freelancer, for the start up’s use. When copyright law sides with the author… Copyright law protects the author of any work created in a fixed form. This means work that is tangible (rather than merely an idea), such as poetry, photography and computer software. Basically, only the author – or anyone who receives rights from the author – may use their work for their own purposes. The author of a work protected by copyright retains the right to make copies, to prepare derivative works, Read More…


Don’t Do It Yourself: Incorporation

Elena Volkova on October 31, 2013

As we are coming up on our 2nd anniversary as a law firm, I’ve looked back at some of the most interesting issues that we’ve encountered. My biggest discovery (and confession)? I completely flip-flopped on the incorporation issue. When we started out, I told Rosanna that I did not think it was worth it for our clients to pay us to incorporate them. With the abundance of online filing providers and an internet full of incorporation advice, I thought that there was absolutely no room for our services. In the last two years, I realized that I was wrong. I Read More…


What Gives More Protection: An LLC or a Regular Corporation?

Volkova Law Group PLLC on October 18, 2013

As a business lawyer, I get this question a lot: Is it true that an LLC gives its owners less protection than a regular corporation? My answer is: No, it is not true. But the devil is in the details. First of all, let’s define what we mean by “protection.” When people form a corporate entity, they do it primarily to protect their personal assets (like their savings and personal property) against business debts and liabilities. This protection is called “limited liability.” It is not absolute, meaning, in some circumstances, an owner of the business entity may be personally responsible Read More…


Should I Incorporate My Business?

Elena Volkova on September 9, 2013

One of the most frequent questions I’m asked by entrepreneurs and local business owners is, “Do I need to incorporate my business?” In most cases, the answer is yes. Here’s why… Incorporating creates a wall between your personal property and your business assets. Your private/personal assets include your savings, investments, and home and other real estate. Your business assets include your cash on hand, receivables, inventory, and other items of value that belong to the company. Known as “limited liability,” this wall shields your private assets from any claims relating to the company. If you are not incorporated… Business creditors Read More…


Business Succession Plan: Are You Ready?

Volkova Law Group PLLC on May 7, 2013

If you are a business owner, do you ever wake up in the morning and ask yourself: who will run my business if I am not around? I know I do. And it turns out many other business owners do, too. On April 10, 2013, we conducted a workshop at In Good Company on this very question. We spent two hours analyzing the “what if” scenarios and concluded by outlining succession plans for the participants. Here is a short checklist of what you can do to start planning and give yourself some peace of mind: 1. Gather your corporate documents Read More…


Health Care Law in Practice

Volkova Law Group PLLC on December 31, 2012

Volkova Law Group PLLC and Health Care Rights Initiative invite you to a free seminar on Health Care Law in Practice. The seminar will focus on the federal health care law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and will provide information for small and mid-size community-based medical providers on the “nuts and bolts” of ACA. Topics include updates on: Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement; electronic billing and HIPAA compliance; and the timeline for ACA implementation. The seminar is free but advance registration is requested. Please click here for dates and registration information. var hupso_services_t=new Array(“Twitter”,”Facebook”,”Google Plus”,”Linkedin”,”Email”);var hupso_background_t=”#EAF4FF”;var Read More…


The Business of Choreography and Choreographing Copyright – The Relationship between Copyright and Dance

Tyler Jaramillo on July 25, 2012

Copyright is a powerful tool for protecting works of art. As an art form, choreographed dance and movement often goes unprotected. Copyright protection is overlooked in the world of choreography, largely because there is a custom of sharing movement. Sharing choreography allows new styles to develop. Choreography continues to go unprotected because of the belief that copyright would limit the custom of sharing thereby undermining the art form itself. This tension reflects the tension between supporting ownership and public access that is inherent in any copyright discussion. Copyright is particularly well suited for choreography for the following reasons: copyright supports Read More…


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